Josh D. Weiss-USA TODAY Sports

Texas A&M tries to be like the Georgia Bulldogs

One of the great things about being a member of the Georgia Bulldogs nation is the unity and school pride that can come through simple yells, slogans and even Twitter hashtags.

Some of the more common UGA slogans and yells include, “To hell with Tech”, “We run this state”, “Damn good Dawg” and, of course “Go Dawgs!” All of these slogans and yells generally have accompanying Twitter hashtags.

It seems as though SEC-newbies Texas A&M wants to try to be like the Bulldogs, and have adopted one of Georgia’s sacred slogans for their very own. From a story in CollegeFootballTalk.com:

The other hashtag making the rounds through the Texas A&M social networks now is #WRTS, which supposedly stands for “We run this state.” Sumlin has not used the hashtag but others have been using it to help support the idea that Texas A&M is dominating the state of Texas when it comes to recruiting compared to both in-state and SEC rivals. So, where is the top talent in Texas heading?

Here’s more on the Aggies rip-off of UGA’s favorite Tech-bashing chant from the Dallas Morning News:

It’s #WRTS, the hashtag that’s been popping up all over A&M social media on recruiting topics.

Supposedly, it stands for “We Run This State.” The abbreviation can be found on A&M football’s official Twitter feed and blasted out by Aggie coaches and recruits. It would appear to epitomize A&M’s heightened attitude as a program, with the school now in its third year in the SEC and under Sumlin, a brazen brag to both SEC rivals and in-state programs.

Georgia hasn’t had the pleasure of welcoming the Aggies to Athens since their admission into the conference in 2012, nor have the Bulldogs paid a visit to College Station, Tx. But if the use of this hashtag/slogan continues by the Aggies, it will definitely stir up a hornet’s nest when the two do end up clashing.

Obviously there is no trademark or copyright by UGA to be infringed upon, but sometimes it’s better to just leave things that another school holds as tradition alone.

Our question is, how can they claim to run their state, when they don’t even play their biggest in-state rival anymore? Sounds suspect if you ask us.

For more on all the happenings in Georgia Athletics be sure to follow DawnoftheDawg on Facebook, Twitter, and use our Android/iOS app to get updates directly from Fansided. Or you can receive email updates from DawnOftheDawg.com, by completing the following form here.

Tags: Football Georgia Bulldogs Kevin Sumlin

  • John Jakubik

    I didn’t realize the U. of Georgia was in Texas. Lame claim to a generic saying.

    • Michael Collins

      Generic saying…you mean like “Home of the 12th man”?

      • MDKDM

        Except that refers to a specific event and person in regard to the A&M football program.

        • Michael Collins

          Still generic. Anyone can have a “12th man”…such as the Seahawks. To UGA #WRTS has been a yearly event/slogan when they beat Georgia Tech.

          • txfooz

            The Seahawks pay A&M to use the 12th Man slogan. Everyone else gets a C&D letter. Ya’ll worry about running Georgia and we’ll worry about Texas.

          • Michael Collins

            I see, so what you’re saying is that its ok for TAMU to borrow from other programs, but when someone does it to you, they get wrist-slapped? Hmmm. OK. Respect our traditions and we’ll respect yours. That’s all I’m saying.

          • txfooz

            Is it trademarked? If not, it’s free for anyone to use it. If it means anything to you, trademark it. If not, it’s just another generic saying like “Go Team!”.

          • Michael Collins

            Using the legal aspects is weak sauce. Whether or not “12th man” was trademarked, most would recognize that it was associated with TAMU. Just talking about a matter of respecting other program’s traditions.

          • txfooz

            That’s the thing, no one besides Georgia associates “#WRTS” with Georgia.

          • Michael Collins

            Said the guy whose team has only been in the conference for two years.

          • MDKDM

            I don’t think people are really disrespecting Georgia (at least not most of the people I know). 99% of them didn’t even know about it until this story. I also see it as different because A&M is using it in relation to recruiting battles, not as a slogan/tradition after beating a rival…I don’t want our program to copy anyone, but I don’t think we are trying to incorporate a Georgia tradition since it is used differently.

          • John Jakubik

            “The tradition of the Twelfth Man was born on the second of January 1922, when an
            underdog Aggie team was playing Centre College, then the nation’s top ranked team. As the
            hard fought game wore on, and the Aggies dug deeply into their limited reserves, Coach
            Dana X. Bible remembered a squad man who was not in uniform. He had been up in the press
            box helping reporters identify players. His name was E. King Gill, and was a former
            football player who was only playing basketball. Gill was called from the stands, suited
            up, and stood ready throughout the rest of the game, which A&M finally won 22-14″

            I didn’t realize Georgia actually had a tradition of almost 100 years with this and trademarked it as well.

          • Michael Collins

            Should it matter how long it’s been a tradition? Wasn’t the 12th man only a couple of decades old at one point?

          • John Jakubik

            It matters if you understand trademarking and why A&M owns it. And no it is not a couple decades old, it has been commonly used at Texas A&M since 1922 and has been on the stadium since the 1970′s

          • Michael Collins

            you didn’t read what I said. I said it was a couple of decades old at one point

  • Michael Collins

    For those in this tread who are saying “We didn’t know, we weren’t trying to copy”, I tip my hat. At least you acknowledge that perhaps you weren’t first in line on this one.

    • John Jakubik

      Nor were you